Widespread Crop Failures Happening All Over America

Written by Michael Snyder

Snow day in Central Texas - Temple Daily Telegram: Gallery

We are witnessing “unprecedented” crop failures all across the United States, but the big mainstream news networks are not talking too much about this yet.

As you will see below, local news outlets all over the nation are reporting the disasters that are taking place in their own local areas, but very few people are putting the pieces of the puzzle together on a national level.

The endless rain and horrific flooding during the early months of this year resulted in tremendous delays in getting crops planted in many areas, and now snow and bitterly cold temperatures are turning harvest season into a complete and utter nightmare all over the country.  I am going to share with you a whole bunch of examples below, but first I wanted to mention the snow and bitterly cold air that are rolling through the middle of the nation right now

A wintry weather pattern that brought single-digit temperatures and more than a foot of snow to parts of the Upper Midwest rolled across a wide swath of the nation Monday, threatening to break hundreds of records and bring a deep freeze as far south as Florida.

“The coldest surge of arctic air so far this season will bring widespread record low temperatures for much of the central and eastern U.S. even down to the Gulf Coast,” said Kwan-Yin Kong, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center.

We are being told that “more than 300 daily records” are likely to be broken, and this will be the final nail in the coffin for this harvest season for countless numbers of farmers.

And even without this latest wave of bitterly cold weather, this was already going to be the worst year for U.S. agriculture that most people can remember.  The following are 12 examples of the crop disasters that we are witnessing right now…

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#1 North Dakota: “Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue has approved North Dakota’s request for a Secretarial disaster designation for 47 counties related to late season rainfall and the October snowstorm.

The declaration came on Friday, Nov. 8, the same day that Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., hosted Bill Northey, U.S. Department of Agriculture’s under secretary for farm production and conservation, to hear from producers at a roundtable and see the impacts of flooding and the early blizzard during a field tour in the Red River Valley.”

#1 Northwest Minnesota: “Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz asked the U.S. agriculture secretary on Thursday to declare a disaster for 12 counties of northwestern Minnesota where farmers are struggling through a very difficult harvest season. The governor said in a letter to Secretary Sonny Perdue that unrelenting bad weather has come on top of challenges farmers were already facing from low commodity prices and trade uncertainties. He told Purdue how the region’s crops have fallen victim to flooding, disease and freezing temperatures, leaving many producers unable to harvest them.”

#1 Iowa: “Last week, according to the Iowa weekly growing season report for the week ending Nov. 3, Iowa’s average temperature was 33 degrees, 12.6 degrees below normal, and with the southerly dip in the jet stream came multiple fast-moving winter-type systems through Iowa during the week, bringing a statewide average of 2.4 inches of snow. Mason City farmer Kevin Pope said with the early snow, all harvest has been halted.”

#1 Ohio: Three local counties are among the 14 in Ohio that the United States Department of Agriculture said are primary natural disaster areas. Champaign, Clark and Miami counties were added to a growing list of designated primary natural disaster areas, which means farmers in those counties can apply for disaster loans. Farmers are eligible only if they suffered a 30% loss in crop production or a physical loss of livestock, livestock products and real estate.

#1 The Red River Valley: “Near Grand Forks, Minnesota, successive nights of subfreezing temperatures from late October into early November caused an estimated $45 million in damage to around 9,000 acres of red and yellow potato crops in the Red River Valley. Wet conditions in October delayed the potato harvest that usually occurs around Oct. 1. This left about half of the red and yellow crops, which are grown for the fresh market, vulnerable to frost damage. This is what Ted Kreis, spokesman for the Northern Plains Potato Growers Association, told Fresh Plaza on Nov. 4.”

#1 Illinois: “Pritzker filed an appeal of the agency’s denial last week, saying the federal government is withholding assistance from 1.4 million Illinois residents affected by the flooding, which the Illinois Emergency Management Agency determined was the state’s worst in more than 25 years. The conditions caused delays for farmers planting spring crops, including corn and soybean, and prompted the U.S. Department of Agriculture to declare an agriculture disaster in the state in August.”

#1 Colorado: “There is no doubt that extreme weather has greatly impacted agricultural producers over the last several years, and 2019 is no exception,” said Clarice Navarro, executive director for Farm Service Agency in Colorado. “With record amounts of crops prevented from planting nationwide and other devastation, more than $3 billion is available through this disaster relief package passed by Congress and signed by President Trump in early June.”

#1 Kentucky: “The federal government has approved Kentucky’s request for a disaster declaration for counties in which farmers’ crops were negatively affected by this summer’s drought.  In an Oct. 16 letter to Brian Lacefield, the state executive director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency, Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles asks that the federal agency consider a disaster declaration for Kentucky counties that “have suffered losses due to the extreme heat and drought.”

#1 South Carolina: “U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue recently designated six counties in South Carolina as natural disaster areas due to drought. They are: Bamberg, Calhoun, Kershaw, Lexington, Orangeburg and Richland.”

#1 Birch Hills County: “Birch Hills County has joined the County of Grande Prairie and Saddle Hills County in declaring an agriculture disaster. In a release, they say some farmers still have up to 50 percent of this year’s crop that is unharvested, while Hay crops in Birch Hills were harvested late, with some not able to be taken off the ground at all.”

#1 Crookston, Minnesota: “Sugar beet and potato farmers whose crops have been hard hit by excessive moisture this harvest converged on Crookston Tuesday, Nov. 5, to tell U.S. Rep. Collin Peterson about their unprecedented crop losses.”

#1 Idaho: There was sadness and dismay in eastern Idaho’s potato community this weekend as the 2019 harvest wound down and growers began tallying up their losses from October’s disastrous freeze while pondering what to do with the tons of unusable tubers it left behind. This season’s harvest will be marked by tons of decaying potatoes for which there is no home.

Are you starting to get the picture?

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Comments (14)

  • Avatar

    jerry krause

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    Hi Michael,

    As a high school student one of my classes the first three years was vocational agriculture.. Which qualified me to become a member of the organization known as the Future Farmers of America (FFA). Because my long term career did not include becoming farming I did not take vocational agriculture my senior year because I became a partner with my 10 year brother in the family farm and I continued to a active partner in this family farm until I graduated from an university with a BS degree in science education.

    I find that the Creed of the FFA, which I memorized in the 1950s has been revised serve times. But this portion of the present creed summarizes what I cannot precisely remember.

    “for I know the joys and discomforts of agricultural life and hold an inborn fondness for those association, even in hours of discouragement, I cannot deny”.

    My brother, now 88 has retired from our family’s farming operations as his son and grandson activity continue this family which has grown bigger and bigger as technology has allowed the productivity of the family farming operations to grow and grow.

    And I know the family farm as grown and grown over the decades because during the planting time and the harvest time the farm has grown because my family has always worked 80 hour. weeks during these two critical seasons of a modern farmer’s life (if they are going to survive the “hours of discouragement”)

    Hence, review your list of farmer’s hours of discouragement, tell me which actual farmer is ‘crying’ about the present year’s ‘hours of discouragement’ which have always been regularly occurring in a farmer’s life. As these USA farmer’s not only provide the food for the our nations population plus for those populations of other nations whose farmers, for one reason or another, are not providing the food necessary to feed the populations of these other nations.

    The farmers of the USA are given the freedom to profit from their labors which successful farming requires,

    Have a good day, Jerry

    • Avatar

      richard

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      “are not providing the food necessary to feed the populations of these other nations” I have to strongly disagree.

      Weird comment as the World Obesity Federation states that a third of the world’s population is now obese and increasing- this is across every continent.

      Add on-

      Agriculture yields are up- https://ourworldindata.org/yields-and-land-use-in-agriculture#yields-since-1960.
      Poverty has decreased- https://ourworldindata.org/a-history-of-global-living-conditions-in-5-charts.
      Life expectancy has increased- https://ourworldindata.org/life-expectancy.

      Add on that vast swathes of the world are now harvesting bio-fuels – any real shortages would put this to bed. This year was a bumper harvest world-wide. Year on year the world has been harvesting bumper harvests due to benign weather.

      • Avatar

        jerry krause

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        Hi Richard,

        “Weird comment as the World Obesity Federation states that a third of the world’s population is now obese and increasing- this is across every continent.”

        This comment ignores that a lack of food may be a reason that some portion of the other two thirds of the world’s population may be starving.

        Have a good day, Jerry

  • Avatar

    Jerry

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    Western Canada, Alberta to Manitoba, is experiencing similar issues.

  • Avatar

    richard

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    You obviously have not read how yields are improving year on year so much so that the world’s population is increasing a million a week , the fastest in the third world countries.

    Agriculture yields are up- https://ourworldindata.org/yields-and-land-use-in-agriculture#yields-since-1960.
    Poverty has decreased- https://ourworldindata.org/a-history-of-global-living-conditions-in-5-charts.

    I look forward to your graphs illustrating the opposite.

    Have a very good day, Jerry.

  • Avatar

    jerry krause

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    Hi Richard,

    You wrote: “You obviously have not read how yields are improving year on year so much so that the world’s population is increasing a million a week , the fastest in the third world countries.”

    And evidently this information does not bother you. It bothers me tremendously for I am a practical person. And I know that a farmer has to be a practical person to survive. Just as the human race had to have been in order to survive during the prehistoric times without any modern manufactured tools. These prehistoric people had to invent and then construct their prehistoric tools that they used to survive.

    Have a good day, Jerry

    • Avatar

      richard

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      cold is a bitch.

      Funny as this land was probably covered in Prairie grass , a drought resistant plant, until ploughed up in the 19th century.

  • Avatar

    Ray

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    Latest Crop report by USDA. CHATTER on the ground from farming community says the USDA under reporting declines in crops. But if you look at their latest report a clear picture is very obvious. There seems to be a force behind the curtain for whatever reason suppressing the seriousness of the loss of Crop production in North America and the economic impacts both to the farming community and the economy of secondary product production and the final impact to consumers.
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1MrgN3v8YO4_kx_ae20LIZ_2cGB2-0yZZ/view?usp=drivesdk

    • Avatar

      richard

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      Though amazing what they produced on less acreage –

      “On Sept. 30, USDA released its Small Grains Summary noting that 2019/20 U.S. wheat production increased to 53.3 million metric tons (MMT), up 4 percent from last year due to significant improvements in yield despite lower planted area”

      The world price of grain indicates the glut.

Comments are closed