July 11, 1954 – Hottest Day On Record In Colorado

Written by Tony Heller

 

On July 11, 1954, Sedgwick, Colorado, reached 114 degrees, the hottest temperature ever recorded in Colorado.

Boulder was 104 degrees, during a string of four consecutive days over 100 degrees. It was the hottest temperature ever recorded in Boulder, and the only time Boulder had four days in a row over 100 degrees.

Nebraska was 116 degrees, Kansas was 115, Oklahoma 112, and Missouri 110 degrees.

Most of the US was in severe or extreme drought.

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Later that summer, New England was hit by two major hurricanes, which were the last major hurricanes to hit New England. Followed by hurricane Hazel, which was the deadliest hurricane to ever hit Canada. Hazel created a storm surge on Lake Ontario which killed more than 100 people in Toronto.

Something changed after 1954 and the likelihood of hot weather plummeted in the US. A couple of hot summers occurred in 1980 and 1988, but for the most part, US summers have been much cooler since 1954.

Meanwhile, the press continues to lie about the heat – like they do about everything else.

Huge amounts of moisture are streaming into the southwest, with lots of rain and temperatures forecast well below normal for the next couple of weeks.

Weather Street: Clouds and Precipitation Forecast Movie

Read more at Real Climate Science

Comments (4)

  • Avatar

    Carl

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    “Huge amounts of moisture are streaming into the southwest, with lots of rain and temperatures forecast well below normal for the next couple of weeks.”

    This, of course, is opposite from what the “greenhouse effect” hypothesis say should happen. It says that as atmospheric water content goes up in the form of high humidity and high cloud cover surface level air temperatures should to go up as well because atmospheric water content is supposed to be causing ~25 C of the 33 C “greenhouse effect”. According to the “greenhouse effect” hypothesis surface level air temperatures and atmospheric water content should be directly proportional, but they are not; they are inversely proportional. As atmospheric water content goes up surface-level air temperatures goes down.

    I will state what your article implies. The 1954 heat wave in the interior of the USA happened because there was a 1954 drought, i.e., because there was too little water in the atmosphere to keep surface level air temperatures down around normal. Thus, it was not due to an enhanced “greenhouse effect” from too much water in the atmosphere; just the opposite.

    • Avatar

      jerry krause

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      Hi Carl,

      You are right about the influence of the 1954 drought but I doubt you are right about the cause of the record high temperatures. A very ‘dry’ soil can have a very low thermal conductivity. Hence little of the radiation absorbed at the surface is conducted deep into the soil during the daytime and there is little water in soil be be evaporated to cool the surface. Look at this data (https://principia-scientific.org/record-temperature-result-of-cloud-revised-updated/)

      Have a good day, Jerry

  • Avatar

    Carl

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    What I said was, “there was too little water in the atmosphere to keep surface level air temperatures down around normal.” Since atmospheric water is the source of the moisture present in top soil, which you point out increases the soils conductivity and also makes available soil moisture for evaporative cooling, I felt it unnecessary to give a detailed account in that short post of every stage in the Earth’s surface-cooling water cycle in order to assert that there exists an inverse relationship between atmospheric water content and surface-level air temperatures. But if we must here we go:

    1) The power of sunlight evaporates ocean water, which creates “atmospheric water”, i.e., humidity
    2) wind currents carry this “atmospheric water” inland
    3) “atmospheric water” increases the emissivity of the air, which allows it to cool more efficiently via emitting IR radiation into space.
    4) that “atmospheric water” either while still over the ocean or after it gets inland condenses into cloud cover and this shades the surface
    5) those clouds precipitate and that precipitation cools the surface even further because snow, rain and hail are almost always cooler than the soil upon which it lands.
    6) that precipitation makes the soil moist which both increases its conductivity and increases its specific heat
    7) that soil moisture is then available for evaporation, which cools the surface even further.
    8) the cycle repeats

    In 1954 less than the usual amount of “water in the atmosphere” was carried from the oceans into the inland areas of the United States to fuel the normal intensity of the Earth’s surface-cooling water cycle. Hence “there was too little water in the atmosphere to keep surface level air temperatures down around normal.”

  • Avatar

    jerry krause

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    Hi Carl,

    In my essay (https://principia-scientific.org/record-temperature-result-of-cloud-revised-updated/) in which I compare certain USCRN data for the same five consecutive days for two consecutive years (2012 and 2013) I did not consider either the atmosphere’s relative humidity (RH)or the soil moistures contents. For as you said, one cannot describe everything when one is trying to be brief. But I am very aware of what they were during the two different years.

    They were comparable during both years. Most hours the RH was less than 20% and the soil moisture content at 5cm depth was below 0.020?? (the units are not critical because these values must be compared with the values for wetter soils to see that this value is that of a quite dry soil).

    But I happened to look at the data for Palestine TX for the same five days of the same two years. I found that the maximum average surface at one hour in 2012 was 62.9C when the RH was 36% and the soil moisture at 5cm was 0.069 and in 2013 these values were 64.6C, 27%, and 0.009. And the evidence (ave solar, max solar, min solar) was that the greatest surface temperatures observed occurred when the atmosphere was clearly cloudy.

    My point in replying to your comments and in my essay was that one must focus upon actual data. Tony had a figure of the 90+ degree days over a large portion of the central USA. I consider this is actual data which supports the idea that extensive high, thin, cloud can cause record temperatures. Yes, there are certain other conditions such as a dry soil (or low thermal conductivily soil) which are necessary.

    But, for some reason, the maximum average air temperature for an hour at Palestine never exceeded 40C even though its maximum average surface temperature for an hour exceeded any at Mercury NV. I believe mechanical engineers can explain how it is that the surface temperature can be more than 20C greater than the air temperature only about 1.5 meter above the surface; but I cannot. I can only observe that this significant temperature difference exists.

    Have a good day, Jerry

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