Colder right now than throughout almost all of history

Written by iceagenow.info

And yet, our leaders keep on harping about global warming:

Temperature and CO2 thru time

And CO2 levels were higher than today throughout almost all of history.

When you look at the above chart, you will see almost no correlation between atmospheric CO2 levels and temperature.

“The Late Carboniferous to Early Permian (315 mya — 270 mya) is the only time period in the last 600 million years when both atmospheric CO2 and temperatures were as low as they are today (Quaternary Period ).

“Compared to former geologic times, our present atmosphere, like the Late Carboniferous atmosphere, is CO2- impoverished!”

Graph from “Climate and the Carboniferous Period”
http://www.geocraft.com/WVFossils/Carboniferous_climate.html

Thanks to Guy (Terra Hertz) for this link

“There’s simply no way for AGW and this chart to both be true,” says Guy. “Anyone who says they can’t see the fundamental incompatibility is either lying or retarded.”

Read more at iceagenow.info

Comments (1)

  • Avatar

    Peter Champness

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    “There’s simply no way for AGW and this chart to both be true,”
    I would certainly like the Chart to be true. But I see a few problems with the chart:
    Firstly it is based entirely on proxy measure reconstructions,
    2. The average global; temperature for most of the last 600M years is shown as 10C warmer than present conditions, which seems a lot,
    3. The chart shows we are in an ice age right now (which could be correct),
    4. The warm periods are much longer than the ice ages. I thought it was the other way around,
    5. The uncertainty for the CO2 levels is huge, but for some reason shrinks way down in the late carboniferous period, then goes up again, How can that be
    6. If CO2 levels recovered during the Permian, Triassic and AND Jurassic what caused that. If we do not know can we accept the estimate.
    7. The chart does show a sort of correlation between atmospheric CO2 levels and average global temperatures, except for a curious dip in temperature during the Ordovician epoch.

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